More Employers Requiring Same-Sex Couples to Marry to Receive Benefits

Posted September 27, 2017 by Megan DiMartino in Uncategorized | 0 comments

More employers are requiring same-sex couples to marry to receive health care benefits after the 2015 Supreme Court ruling to legalize same-sex marriage. The International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans revealed that three in ten employers will be eliminating same-sex domestic partner benefits.

The year prior to the Supreme Court ruling, employers reported that:

  • 51% provided benefits to same-sex partners in civil unions
  • 59% provided benefits to same-sex domestic partners
  • 79% provided benefits to same-sex spouses

The year after the Supreme Court ruling, employers reported that:

  • 31% are providing benefits to same-sex partners in civil unions (down 20% from 2014)
  • 48% are providing benefits to same-sex domestic partners (down 11% from 2014)

At the same time, the larger companies (10,000 or more employees) are more likely to continue offering same-sex domestic partner benefits and most employers (86%) are providing benefits to same-sex spouses, which is an increase of 7% from 2014. Offering the same coverage to same-sex couples and opposite-sex couples makes it fair, consistent and an easier task for administrators.

Julie Stich, CEBS, Associate VP of Content at the International Foundation states that she “wouldn’t expect all employers to drop the domestic partner benefits” though. “Competitive employers are always working to provide an inclusive benefit package, and offering domestic partner benefits can build a culture of inclusion and help the company attract the best talent.”

Source: International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans | Employers Dropping Domestic Partner Benefits

Links:
Employee Benefits Survey: 2016 Results
Domestic Partner Benefits After the Supreme Court Decision: 2015 Survey Results
Employee Benefits for Same-Sex Couples: The DOMA Decision One Year Later

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

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